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The Global Institute of Logistics (GIL) was established in 2003  and today represents a community of organizations and professionals from across the world that share a commitment to collaborating on global logistics solutions.

The Institute was established in 2003 under the Chairman of renowned US logistician and author Robert V. Delaney in response to the global logistics industry’s call for “joined up thinking” amongst the stakeholders in the global supply chain. The Institute provides practitioners with an international forum for peer group networking, discussion and learning on latest developments in global logistics strategy.

GIL's objective is to provide the global  logistics industry with a forum through which global shippers, 3PLs, carriers, port authorities and terminal operators can collaborate closely to share their knowledge so as to improve supply chain efficiency. Stakeholders are encouraged to co-operate closely and consistently in leveraging best industry practices to add real value to the supply chain management process.

Globalization has led to faster, cost effective and reliable communications and transport options. Companies are extending their value-creation processes around the world because of lower transport costs. This has led to a growing demand for logistics, and all its elements, transport, storage, transshipment, communications, planning and control services. This demand led growth has increased pressure on Beneficial Cargo Owners to optimize the quality and costs of their logistics services.

The quality and costs of logistics services are directly influenced by the level of collaboration between the parties responsible for the execution of the task. Collaboration results in more effective co-ordination and control in the flow of goods between the point of origin and the point of consumption. Collaboration increases communication resulting in the harmonization of the freight, finance and data flows that constitute the logistics process. The net effect is increased reliability, lowers costs and improved inventory management.

The vision of the Institute is the establishment of Collaboration as best practice in logistics execution.

The mission of GIL is to establish a global community who are committed to collaborating on global logistics solutions.

This is achieved by:

  • By recognizing the individuals and companies who are making a contribution to the development of logistics.
  • Providing the platform for this community to engage in collaboration.
  • Documenting best practice developed by the community.
  • Promoting collaboration in logistics.

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GIL IMPROVING GLOBAL LOGISTICS ONE PORT AT A TIME

GIL promotes collaboration between stakeholders in the logistics industry. By Collaboration we mean the creation, development and maintenance of relationships between global supply chain partners resulting in mutual exchange and fulfilment of promises at a profit. It is a philosophy for doing business successfully; it promotes a culture that puts the buyer-seller relationship at the centre of a firm’s strategic and operational thinking.

Logistics systems are the arteries of trade and central to the success of globalization in the 21st century. Beneficial Cargo Owners are basing decisions on how they organise production and in fact their whole corporate structures entirely on the provision of logistics services. The ‘modular production’ model is an example. In this, contract Beneficial Cargo Owners carry out production against a background of organisational change. The set-up comprises small and large firms, and small and large geographical scales; it aims to create a large number of products in few processes to receive maximum revenue through economies of scale. Logistics has grown to become the key unit within this set-up, since it has to provide agility and flexibility for any one module, as well as for the interaction of all modules, in the entire network. That means organisational as well as geographical flexibility. Thus a major shift has occurred in how and where commodities and their components are being assembled, manufactured and distributed.

This combined with the continued push toward efficient manufacturing processes such as lean and Six Sigma mean that it’s not enough for Beneficial Cargo Owners to know that critical parts or stocks are on the way or have been shipped. They need to know exactly where supplies are in the supply chain, whether they've cleared customs, whether they’re sitting in a warehouse or if they’re on the last leg in a journey to the loading-dock or the customer.

For the global logistics system to work in support of these new models there has to be increased collaboration between logistics service providers across continents. This is the work of the Institute to encourage and develops collaboration between these providers, resulting in higher logistics service quality and consequently a better economic performance of all partners.

By Collaboration we mean the creation, development and maintenance of relationships between global supply chain partners resulting in mutual exchange and fulfilment of promises at a profit. It is a philosophy for doing business successfully; it promotes a culture that puts the buyer-seller relationship at the centre of a firm’s strategic and operational thinking.

The Institute has a particular focus on maritime container logistics which is perceived as highly fragmented. We work closely with port authorities, container terminal operators,shipping lines, freight forwarders and 3PL's and encourage them to re-think their role in the logistics process. Our aim is to break down the silo based approach to process execution in the container logistics supply chain.


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GIL IMPROVING GLOBAL LOGISTICS ONE PORT AT A TIME

SHENZHEN OCTOBER 2013

INSTITUTE CELEBRATES ITS 10TH BIRTHDAY IN SHENZHEN

In 2003 a group of logistics executives from across the world came together to form the Global Institute of Logistics. 10 Years on GIL is palying its part in making the world smaller through its philosophy of promoting collaboration.

Shenzhen China played host to the 10th anniversary celebrations of the Global Institute of Logistics this October. It was to Shenzhen that Institute researchers first turned their attention to at the time of GIL's inception in 2003.

The Institute's first research program focussed on  how United States Beneficial Cargo Owners (BCO's) sourcing in Southern China engineered "best in class" logistics solutions. The research focussed on the consumer products companies using the Trans Pacific Trade Lane, shipping more than 10,000 TEU annually.
China's entry into the World Trade Organization in November 2001 was the beginning of the present era of globalization. The figures for internationally traded goods between then and now show just how enormous an impact on world trade it had with an increase of over $1 Trillion over the period. This translates directly to a significant increase in container flow, China witnessed a 100% increase in container throughput from 2001-2003.

CLICK HERE TO READ FULL STORY 
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GIL IMPROVING GLOBAL LOGISTICS ONE PORT AT A TIME

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